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Nick Busse is the communications principal for the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization. He lives in Minneapolis, Minn. Opinions expressed via his personal social media accounts do not represent his employer.

CTS Transportation Research Conference Wrap-Up (Photo Gallery)

The 25th Annual CTS Transportation Research Conference successfully concluded earlier today, wrapping up a two-day whirlwind of more than two-dozen sessions showcasing a wide range of transportation research results and innovations.

Presentations and materials from the conference, including video of the keynote speakers, will be made available on the CTS website in coming weeks. In the meantime, here are a few photos from the conference.

Center for Transportation Studies Director Laurie McGinnis
Center for Transportation Studies Director Laurie McGinnis welcomes attendees to the 25th Annual CTS Transportation Research Conference in St. Paul, Minnesota, on May 21, 2014.
MnDOT Chief of Staff Eric Davis
MnDOT Chief of Staff Eric Davis: “Research is vital to our program. It’s vital to our success as a department.”
Joe Casola, staff scientist and program director for the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions
Joe Casola, staff scientist and program director for the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, gives the keynote address on Wednesday. Casola said transportation officials should begin incorporating the projected impacts of climate change, including more frequent extreme weather events, into their planning.
MnROAD Operations Engineer Ben Worel
On Wednesday, MnROAD Operations Engineer Ben Worel moderated a session, “Building the Future on a Solid Foundation,” focused on geotechnical research.
MnDOT Research Services & Library Director Linda Taylor and MnDOT Planning and Data Analysis Director Mark Nelson
From left: MnDOT Research Services & Library Director Linda Taylor and MnDOT Planning and Data Analysis Director Mark Nelson answer questions at a session on transportation pooled-fund research projects.
Jill Hentges, community outreach coordinator for Metro Transit
Jill Hentges, community outreach coordinator for Metro Transit, displays a tool used to help teach the public how planners optimize bus routes during a Thursday session on public engagement. Angie Bersaw, a transportation planner for Bolton & Menk, Inc., looks on.
Bruce Hasbargen, Beltrami County engineer and Local Road Research Board chairman
Bruce Hasbargen, Beltrami County engineer and Local Road Research Board chairman, answers a question at a Wednesday session on local agencies and stakeholder engagement.

Bicycle and pedestrian-counting project wins CTS partnership award

(Feature image courtesy Michael McCarthy, Center for Transportation Studies.)

Earlier this year, we wrote about the Minnesota Bicycle and Pedestrian Counting Initiative, a project that developed guidelines and protocols to help transportation planners accurately count non-motorized traffic. This groundbreaking research involved a diverse partnership of state and local officials, University of Minnesota faculty, and private and nonprofit organizations.

On Wednesday, April 23, the project team (photo above) was honored with an award from the Center for Transportation Studies. Team members accepted the CTS Research Partnership Award in a ceremony at the McNamara Alumni Center in Minneapolis. The award is given each year to projects that have resulted in “significant impacts on transportation” and that draw on “the strengths of their diverse partnerships” to achieve their results.

The video below, produced by CTS, explains the importance of the project. MnDOT is now in the process of implementing the research results by installing permanent counters and using portable counters in select locations around the state. MnDOT plans to use the information for a variety of purposes, including planning, safety analysis, investment planning and quality-of-life analysis.

Project team members will present their research findings at the North American Travel Monitoring Exposition and Conference in July. The conference’s focus is on “Improving Traffic Data Collection, Analysis, and Use.”

*Bonus: Read about last year’s Research Partnership Award-winner, a MnDOT-led, multi-state effort to reduce low-temperature cracking in asphalt pavements.

Learn more about the project:

New technology aimed at making rural intersections safer

This video above showcases a new kind of intersection conflict warning system being developed for use primarily by local agencies at rural, two-way stop intersections. Called the ALERT System, it uses a simple but ingenious combination of radar, wireless communication and flashing LEDs to alert drivers to the presence of approaching vehicles, thereby helping them identify safe gaps in the cross traffic and avoid potentially deadly collisions.

These types of systems are nothing new; MnDOT and other state DOTs have been developing them for more than a decade under the ENTERPRISE pooled fund program. MnDOT also recently kicked off a three-year project to deploy 20–50 of its Rural Intersection Conflict Warning Systems at selected at-risk intersections across the state. The main difference with the ALERT System is that it’s designed to be cheaper and easier to deploy than existing ICWS technologies. While that might sound like an incremental improvement, the difference for cash-strapped local agencies could be huge.

Since the ALERT System uses solar power, it doesn’t have to be hooked up to the power grid — which means that, in theory, county public works crews could install it themselves. The system also uses a simplified controller that doesn’t require a traffic signal technician to install and maintain, and detects vehicles using radar rather than in-pavement sensors. These factors might encourage greater adoption of ICWS technologies, which studies have shown to reduce both the frequency and severity of crashes.

The project is now in its second phase. It still faces a number of hurdles before could be ready to deploy, but Vic Lund, the traffic engineer for St. Louis County and the project’s main champion, says the results so far have been encouraging. In the video below, Lund shares his thoughts on the project, its challenges and the future of Intelligent Transportation Systems in Minnesota.

Learn more: