Tag Archives: teen drivers

New project: Effectiveness of Teenage Driver Support System

The Minnesota Local Road Research Board (LRRB) has funded a follow-up study to determine whether a monitoring system it field tested for new drivers, called the Teen Driver Support System (TDSS), affected teenagers’ long-term driver behavior.

Background

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of teen fatalities. Because of inexperience and risk-seeking propensity, new teenage drivers are more prone to behaviors such as speeding and harsh maneuvers, especially during their first few months of licensure.

In an effort to reduce risky driving among new teenage drivers, in 2011, the LRRB funded a one-year field operational test of a prototype system developed by the University of Minnesota’s ITS Institute, which enabled parents to monitor their child’s driving behavior.

The software ran on a teen’s smart phone, which was mounted to the dashboard and provided instant feedback about risky behavior to the teen and communicated to parents if the behavior continued.

The system didn’t allow incoming or outgoing phone calls (except 911) or texting while driving. It provided visual and auditory warnings about speeding, excessive maneuvers (e.g., hard braking, cornering), and stop sign violations. It also monitored seat belt usage and detected the presence of passengers, two known factors that increase the risk of fatalities among teen drivers. The system could also be programmed to monitor if the teen was driving after the curfew set by parents or required by Minnesota’s graduated license requirements.

In January 2013, the University of Minnesota launched a 300-vehicle, 12-month field operational test in Minnesota to determine the effectiveness of the TDSS in terms of its in-vehicle information and feedback to parents.

Research results indicated an overall safety benefit of TDSS, demonstrating that in-vehicle monitoring and driver alerts, coupled with parental notifications, is a meaningful intervention to reduce the frequency of risky driving behaviors that are correlated with novice teen driver crashes. In particular, the system was shown to be an effective strategy for reducing excessive speeds when used with parental feedback and potentially even without parental involvement.

Project Scope

The TDSS study was cutting-edge at the time. Today, there are many systems in the marketplace which families may seek out to provide added support for their novice teen drivers. However, the long-term effectiveness of these systems is largely unknown. Furthermore, the extent to which the TDSS reduced crashes, injuries, and citations among those who participated in the study is unknown.

This new study will collect information on study participants’ self-reported driving behaviors and driving attitudes, as well collect traffic violation and crash history records from the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

This study proposes to not only provide a follow-up to the TDSS study to further explore the benefit it may have had on participants, but also determine to what extent families, schools, and other organizations should continue to invest in in-vehicle coaching systems similar to the TDSS. Ultimately, the TDSS is a low-cost system, which, if found to have long-term efficacy beyond what was demonstrated in the original study, could help guide cost-effective implementations to reduce crashes among teen or other driver groups.

Watch for new developments on this project.  Other Minnesota research can be found at MnDOT.gov/research.

New video highlights how U of M transportation research makes a difference

CTS aired a new video—”How does University of Minnesota research make a difference?”—at its Annual Meeting and Awards Luncheon on April 6.

The video highlights a variety of U of M research initiatives from 2014-2015. Projects featured focus on hardier roadside grasses, tribal transportation safety, left-turn safety, maximizing system performance, clear roads in winter, well-rested truckers, increased transit ridership, more efficient buses, safer teen drivers, understanding travel behavior, better asphalt pavements, and healthy lakes and rivers.

Teen Driver Support System helps reduce risky driving behavior

Although teen drivers make up a small percentage of the U.S. driving population, they are at an especially high risk of being involved in a crash. In fact, drivers between ages 16 and 19 have higher average annual crash rates than any other age group.

To help teen drivers stay safe on the road, researchers at the U of M’s HumanFIRST Laboratory have been working for nearly 10 years on the development of the Teen Driver Support System (TDSS). The smartphone-based application provides real-time, in-vehicle feedback to teens about their risky behaviors—and reports those behaviors to parents via text message if teens don’t heed the system’s warnings.

TDSS provides alerts about speed limits, upcoming curves, stop sign violations, excessive maneuvers, and seat belt use. It also prevents teens from using their phones to text or call (except 911) while driving.

The research team recently completed a 12-month field operational test of the system with funding from MnDOT. The test involved 300 newly licensed teens from 18 communities in Minnesota.

To measure the effectiveness of the TDSS on driving behavior, the teens were divided into three groups: a control group in which driving behavior was monitored but no feedback was given, a group in which the TDSS provided only in-vehicle feedback to teens, and a group with both in-vehicle and parent feedback from the TDSS.

Preliminary results show that teens in the TDSS groups engaged in less risky behavior, especially the group that included parent feedback. These teens were less likely to speed or to engage in aggressive driving.

Although these results demonstrate that the TDSS can be effective in reducing risky driving behavior in teens, Janet Creaser, HumanFIRST research fellow and a lead researcher on the project, stresses that technology is not a substitute for parent interaction.

“The whole goal of our system is to get parents talking to their teens about safe driving.” Creaser says. “And maybe, if you’re a parent getting 10 text messages a week, you’ll take your teen out and help them learn how to drive a little more safely.”

Read the full article in the November issue of Catalyst.