All posts by Christine Anderson

Affordable Lane-Departure Warning System is on the Road to Market Readiness

This article was originally published in Catalyst, November 2021.

With the improvements made to their lane-departure warning system, U of M researchers are one step closer to preventing highway crashes and deaths. In a recent project, the research team enhanced its lane-departure warning system, which uses standard GPS data rather than expensive cameras or maps—moving toward an affordable, market-ready product to warn drivers about dangerous lane drift due to drowsiness or inattention.

Continue reading Affordable Lane-Departure Warning System is on the Road to Market Readiness

Researchers Study Impact of Transitways on Nearby Roads, Park-and-Ride Choices

This article was originally published in Catalyst, November 2021.

How does a transitway affect automobile traffic on nearby roadways? What factors influence which park-and-ride facilities people choose? These two questions were the focus of a recent two-part project by U of M researchers.

Continue reading Researchers Study Impact of Transitways on Nearby Roads, Park-and-Ride Choices

New Approach Helps Estimate COVID Exposure Risk for Trail Users

This article was originally published in Catalyst, November 2021.

As gyms and indoor health facilities closed during the beginning of the pandemic, people flocked to trails and parks, creating both opportunities and concerns for public health and land managers. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended a six-foot distance between people (even outdoors), but little was known about compliance with these recommendations.

Continue reading New Approach Helps Estimate COVID Exposure Risk for Trail Users

Join us online for the CTS Research Conference

Register to join us at this year’s virtual CTS Transportation Research Conference on November 4!

The event will convene researchers and practitioners to explore the latest innovations in transportation research, implementation efforts, and engagement activities.

Highlights of this year’s event include:

  • An opening keynote by Jonathan Foley, executive director of Project Drawdown, titled “Achieving Drawdown: A Hopeful, Science-Based Plan to Stop Climate Change.” In the presentation, Foley will discuss Project Drawdown’s comprehensive framework for addressing climate change, including the transportation industry’s role in pivoting to a better, more sustainable world.
  • A panel discussion following Foley’s presentation focused on the intersection of transportation, sustainability, and climate change. Panelists will include Elise Harrington, assistant professor in the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, and Ashwat Narayanan, executive director of Our Streets Minneapolis.
  • An afternoon keynote presented by Andrew Wishnia, deputy assistant secretary for climate policy in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Transportation Policy at the United States Department of Transportation.
  • Fifteen concurrent sessions on topics including health and equity in transportation, lessons learned from COVID-19, CAVs, safety, electrification, shared mobility, transit impacts, and more.

The cost to attend is $75, which includes access to recordings of all conference sessions following the event. Registration information and a complete program are available on the conference web page.

U Students Offer Ideas For Transit Changes in Carver County

This article was originally published in Catalyst, August 2021.

The transit needs of Carver County, Minnesota, are undergoing a shift driven by changes in population size and demographics. Student researchers from the U of M teamed up with county planners to identify and address these changing needs.

Continue reading U Students Offer Ideas For Transit Changes in Carver County

Transition to Distance-Based Fees: Where do we go from here?

This article was originally published in Catalyst, August 2021.

As vehicles switch from gas-fueled to electric and revenues from the gas tax begin to decline, experts in the transportation industry are looking for alternative ways to fund roadways. Distance-based user fees (DBUFs) have been gaining political traction as a possibility.

Continue reading Transition to Distance-Based Fees: Where do we go from here?

State-Of-The-Art Vehicle to Drive CAV Research

This article was originally published in Catalyst, August 2021.

With the arrival of its fully outfitted autonomous vehicle in July, the University’s MnCAV Ecosystem is ready to facilitate research and testing of sensing technologies, vehicle control, platooning, traffic patterns, and other topics related to connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs).

Continue reading State-Of-The-Art Vehicle to Drive CAV Research

Save The Date: 2021 CTS Transportation Research Conference

Join the Center for Transportation Studies for a day of discovery and innovation at this year’s Transportation Research Conference, scheduled for November 4, 2021, at the Graduate Minneapolis Hotel. The annual event will convene researchers and practitioners to explore the latest innovations in transportation research, implementation efforts, and engagement activities.

Continue reading Save The Date: 2021 CTS Transportation Research Conference

A Long-Term Approach to Green Stormwater Infrastructure

This article was originally published in Catalyst, May 2021.

Strategies for managing stormwater runoff have been steadily undergoing a shift in recent decades toward “green” infrastructure. This is a potentially beneficial change, but transportation professionals are beginning to recognize a need for better information on how to properly design, implement, and maintain these facilities.

Continue reading A Long-Term Approach to Green Stormwater Infrastructure

Researchers Develop Analytics Tool to Predict Gaps in Metro Transit Bus Driver Schedules

This article was originally published in Catalyst, February 2021.

Solving real-world problems sometimes requires a very boots-on-the-ground approach. When Metro Transit began experiencing a bus driver shortage, researchers from the University of Minnesota (U of M) decided to do some first-hand observations of bus dispatcher life in order to develop a tool that could make scheduling easier.

Continue reading Researchers Develop Analytics Tool to Predict Gaps in Metro Transit Bus Driver Schedules