Decoding the Deicers

The results of last season’s deicing study are in — just in time for our next snow.

Last winter, Minnesota State University researcher Steve Druschel set up experimental lanes at two Shakopee entertainment parks and a test site on a Mankato bridge to examine the life cycle of winter maintenance, from plowing and the application of chemicals to the drainage of chemical residue after the roadway has been treated.

What the Study Found

  • The majority of chloride appears to leave the roadway by plow ejection, vehicle carry-away or tire-spray spreading, rather than through storm drainage, even in warmer storms.
  • Pavements don’t hold chloride very long in a precipitation event, even after anti-icing/pre-treatment.
  • Deicer effectiveness. Warmer temperatures provide more melt from the deicer. Little melt was observed below
    10 degrees Fahrenheit unless sunlight provided warming, and prewetting produced no significant difference in deicer performance.
  • Dry pavements may be better candidates for pretreatment, with researchers noting that any wetness on the pavement ahead of a storm limited anti-icer effectiveness.
  • Truck traffic after deicer application was found to significantly improve deicer performance, resulting in both a wider and quicker melt.
  • Plow effectiveness. Even with different snow and temperature conditions, the evaluation of plow speed provided the same findings: snow rises higher in the curvature of the plow at higher speeds, creating a broader spray off the plow ends, and higher speeds decrease scrape quality.
Students pour water to form ice on a test lane in Shakopee.
Students pour water to form ice on a test lane in Shakopee.

What’s Next?

The research team has proposed a third phase of this project to continue their work in the field, which is expected to include further examination of the impact of truck traffic on deicer effectiveness, variations in plow setup and expanded testing under varying weather conditions and snow structure.

Related Resources

Field Effects on Deicing and Anti-Icing Performance – Technical Summary (PDF, 1 MB, 2 pages); Final Report (coming soon)

Salt Brine Blending to Optimize Deicing and Anti-Icing Performance –Technical Summary (PDF, 1 MB, 2 pages) and Final Report (PDF, 11 MB, 151 pages) (previous study) 

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